Siberian Yupik

Yuit

Юпик

Native to
United States, Russian Federation

Region
Bering Strait region

Ethnicity
Siberian Yupiks

Native speakers

1,010 (2006-2010)[1]

Language family

Eskimo–Aleut

Eskimo

Yupik

Siberian Yupik

Writing system

Latin, Cyrillic

Language codes

ISO 639-3
ess

Glottolog
cent2128[2]

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Siberian Yupik (also known as Central Siberian Yupik, Bering Strait Yupik, Yuit, Yoit, “St. Lawrence Island Yupik”, and in Russia “Chaplinski Yupik” or Yuk) is one of the Yupik languages of the Eskimo–Aleut language family. It the largest Yupik idiom spoken in Siberia, and it is spoken also on St. Lawrence Island. Its speakers, the Siberian Yupik people, are an indigenous people who reside along the coast of the Chukchi Peninsula in the Russian Far East and on St. Lawrence Island in the Alaska villages of Savoonga and Gambell.
In Alaska, about 1,050 people from a total Siberian Yupik population of 1,100 speak the language. In Russia, about 300 of an ethnic population of 1,200 to 1,500 speak the language, making a total of about 1,350 speakers worldwide.

Contents

1 Dialects and subgroups
2 Other Eskimo languages spoken in Siberia

2.1 Other Yupik languages
2.2 Debated classifications

3 Notes
4 References

4.1 English
4.2 Russian

5 References
6 Further reading
7 External links

Dialects and subgroups[edit]

This article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode characters.

Siberian Yupik has two dialects: Chaplinski Yupik is spoken on the shores of the Chukchi Peninsula in the Russian Far North, and St. Lawrence Island Yupik (Sivuqaghmiistun) is spoken on St. Lawrence Island, Alaska. The majority of Chaplinski Yupik speakers live in the villages of Novoye Chaplino and Sireniki, on the coasts of the Chukchi Peninsula. St. Lawrence Island Yupik is believed to be an offspring of Chaplinski and apart from some few phonetic, phonological, morphological, syntactical and lexical peculiarities is practically identical with it.[3]

Asian/Siberian Yupik settlements (red dots)

Chaplino, or Ungazighmiistun, is the largest Yupik language of Siberia (the second one is Naukan), and is named after the settlement of Ungaziq (Novoye Chaplino). The wor