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This article is about the English Church after the Glorious Revolution. For the French Church in the French Revolution, see Civil Constitution of the Clergy § Jurors and non-jurors.
The nonjuring schism was a split in the Anglican churches of England, Scotland and Ireland in the aftermath of the Glorious Revolution of 1688, over whether William III and Mary II could legally be recognised as sovereigns.
The word “nonjuring” means “not swearing [an oath]”, from the Latin verb iūrō or jūrō meaning “to swear an oath”.
Many of the Anglican clergy felt legally bound by their previous oaths of allegiance to James II and, though they could accept William as regent, they could not accept him as king. It was not necessarily a split on matters of religious doctrine, but more of a political issue and a matter of conscience, though most of the nonjurors were high church Anglicans.[1] Thus, latitudinarian Anglicans were handed control of the Church of England, while Presbyterians took control of the Church of Scotland. The nonjurors thus were nominally Jacobite, although they generally did not actively support the Jacobite rebellions in 1715 or 1745.

Contents

1 Nonjuring bishops
2 Nonjurors
3 Resolution
4 References
5 Bibliography
6 External links

Nonjuring bishops[edit]
Five of the “Seven Bishops” who had petition
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